Thursday, May 30, 2024

Which Furs Are the Warmest?

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Fine furs are, understandably, in perennially high demand because they are opulent beyond measure and hold their value well.

But genuine furs are not just aesthetic treasures. They are, first and foremost, practical garments that are highly effective at protecting the wearer from the elements.

With that said, let’s try to crack a question that’s been asked a thousand times over. Which furs are the warmest?

Top Choices (In Generally Descending Order)

The way we’re going to approach this is through a qualitative assessment of the fur itself, substantiated by account of the conditions the fur protects against in the natural world.

So, with no further ado…

Arctic Fox Fur

Though not scientifically defensible, arctic fox fur is considered by many to be the warmest fur in the world.

It is remarkably deep and thick and is designed to protect the fox against some of the harshest conditions on earth.

Arctic foxes are circumpolar animals that live in some of the most inhospitable reaches of the globe. Where they live, it can get colder than -50℉ in the winter.

Please note, however, that this applies only to arctic foxes (and blue fox, which is an arctic fox) and not to red and silver foxes, which have lighter, thinner coats.

Their fur is still warm, though.

Chinchilla Fur

Chinchilla fur is another strong contender for “warmest fur.” Even though these animals don’t live in the polar reaches of the earth, they do live somewhere else very, very cold: the Andes.

It can get as cold as -40℉ in the Andes where Chinchillas live. Hence, their coat is highly protective.

Chinchilla fur is not as deep as arctic fox fur, but it is thicker and softer, and it also has a beautiful silver luster – which many adore.

It’s very close to, if not as warm as, arctic fox fur, and certainly one of the warmest in the world.

Wool (Sheepskin)

Even though wool isn’t usually considered fur, it is the undercoat of a sheep, so by the strictest definition, it is.

Also, wool offers some unique features that other furs do not. While wool may not be as soft or as aesthetically pleasing as other furs, when felted, it can be made waterproof.

Also, when wool does get wet, it retains up to 70% of its thermal insulative properties – so that’s a bonus too.

Sable and Mink Fur: Sort of a Draw

Sable and mink fur are both very warm, but not as warm as chinchilla or arctic fox fur. They repel water and are very protective for how lightweight they are, though.

That said, mink coats are still very warm in the winter and while not as good as some other grades of fur, still offer excellent insulation.

Sable is softer and more luxurious than mink fur, but mink is available in many colors, which makes it very popular, too.

Rabbit Fur

Last but not least we have rabbit fur, which, unfortunately, is not a particularly good insulator. This is because a rabbit’s fur is primarily intended to hide the rabbit, not keep it warm.

Consider snowshoe hares, which are bright white to help conceal them in the snow, and cottontails, which are mottled brown, which keeps them hidden in the undergrowth.

That said, rabbit fur is luxuriously soft, even though it’s not that warm. In fact, it’s among the softest of all furs.

Note: Any Fur Is Better Than No Fur

While these characterizations of fox, chinchilla, rabbit, sable, and mink coats and fur are accurate, remember one more important truth: all furs are good insulators and are better than most if not all synthetics.

If you’re looking for a new fur coat for yourself or a loved one, visit Maximilian.com. They carry a wide range of fur coats, jackets, and accessories like hats and scarves. They even carry some reversible fur coats.

Visit their website via the link above or get in touch with them at 1-800-TLC-FURS.

For More Information about Fox Fur Coat Womens and Reversible Fox Fur Coat Please Visit: Maximilian/BC International Group, Inc.

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